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Tandas / Music

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Date:    Sat, 26 Sep 1998 10:28:20 -0500
From:    "Stephen P. Brown"
Subject: Tandas/Music


     On a recent trip to Denver, Susan and I learned about an interesting
     system of setting up tandas for a milonga on cassette tapes from Tom
     Stermitz.  A similar approach is possible with CD-Rs.

     Each tanda and the cortina is recorded on a separate cassette tape.
     The idea of using the prerecorded tandas is to allow the DJ (me) to
     dance while permitting a fair amount of flexibility in selecting the
     music as the evening progresses.  As a DJ, I like to select music that
     responds to the mood of the dancers.

     I inaugurated the system in Dallas last night.  I arrived with 54
     prerecorded tandas.  During the four hour milonga I played 19 of the
     tandas.  With the tanda and cortina on the tape, I did not have to
     dash back to the equipment.  I walked back to the equipment as the
     cortina began.  It seemed to work quite well.

     In one sense, the system does limits absolute flexibility--the same
     three or four songs will be played in the same order at numerous
     milongas.  And of course, the cortina will remain the same for
     numerous evenings.  (I hope  everyone likes Ry Cooder's Flashes!)

     In setting up the tandas, I generally adhered to the rule of one
     orchestra (in the same style) per tanda, but I also took a few
     liberties here and there.  My list of tandas is below.  The list us
     organized by style/epoch.

     Comments/discussion/suggestions are most welcome.

     --Steve (de Tejas)


     OLD GUARD

      1)  Julio De Caro
        El Monito
        Colombina
        Derecho Viejo
        Boedo
        - all from Compilation, Instrumental Tangos of the Golden Age
          (Harlequin  HQCD 45)

      2)  Orquesta Tipica Victor
        Negro
        Pato
        Re Fa Si
        Che Papusa Oi
        - all from 1926-40 (El Bandoneon  EBCD 88)

      3)  Adolfo Carabelli
        Felicia
        Mi Refugio
        El Cabure
        Cuatro Palabras
        - all from Cuatro Palabras (El Bandoneon EBCD 87)

      4)  Osvaldo Fresedo
        Derecho Viejo
        Arrabalero
        Poliya
        Tigre Viejo
        - all from Tigre Viejo (CD-R available from Alberto Paz)

      5)  Francisco Canaro y Quinteto Pirincho
        Viento en Popa
        Don Esteban
        Champagne Tango
        - all from Nobleza de Arrabal  (El Bandoneon EBCD 90)

      6)  Francisco Canaro
        La Melodia de Nuestro Adios
        El Pescante
        Pampa
        Retintin
        - all from La Melodia de Nuestro Adios (El Bandoneon EBCD 30)

      7)  Francisco Canaro
        Uno
        - from Desde el Alma (EMI)
        Cada Vez Que Me Recuerdes
        - from Desde el Alma (EMI)
        Yira, Yira
        - from Tangos (EPM Musique)
        Derecho Viejo
        - from Tangos (EPM Musique)

      8)  Los Tubatangos
        Caminito
        Rodriguez Pena
        Zorro Gris
        - all from Una Noche de Garufa  (Music Hall  10044-2)

      9)  Mixed Tanda
        Orquesta Tipica Victor - Domino
        - from 1926-1940 (El Bandoneon EBCD 88)
        Adolfo Carabelli - Alma
        - from Cuatro Palabras (El Bandoneon EBCD 87)
        Pedro Laurenz - Nunca Tuvo Novio
        - from Milonga de Mis Amores (El Bandoneon EBCD 82
        Pedro Laurenz - Mala Junta
        - from Compilation, Instrumental Tangos of the Golden Age
          (Harlequin  HQCD 45)

     10)  Mixed Tanda
        La Nuestra de Adios -- Francisco Canaro,
        - from La Melodia de Nuestra Adios (El Bandoneon EBCD 30)
        Yo Soy El Tango -- Miguel Calo,
        - from Yo Soy el Tango  (El Bandoneon EBCD 34)
        El Once -- Osvaldo Fresedo,
        - from El Pibe de la Paternal  (El Bandoneon  EBCD 48)
        Mano a Mano - Francisco Lomuto,
        - from Great Bands of Tango's "Golden Age" 1936-47
          (Harlequin HQCD 89)

     FOUR GIANTS OF THE GOLDEN AGE-D'ARIENZO, DI SARLI, PUGLIESE, TROILO

     11)  Juan D'Arienzo
        El Flete
        - from The Tango Lesson (Movie Soundtrack)  (Sony)
        Pensalo Bien
        - from The Tango Lesson (Movie Soundtrack)  (Sony)
        Union Civica
        - from El Rey del Compas (El Bandoneon)
        Canaro en Paris
        - from El Rey del Compas (El Bandoneon)

     12)  Juan D'Arienzo
        Che Negrito
        Una Alma Buena
        El Tigre Millan
        El Pollo Ricardo
        - all from Vol. 21 (Club Tango Argentino CTA 321)

     13)  Juan D'Arienzo
        Retintin
        Don Esteban
        El Irresistable
        La Marocha
        - all from El Rey del Compas  (El Bandoneon EBCD 43)

     14)  Juan D'Arienzo
        Felicia
        Pacienda
        Viejo Smoking
        Independencia
        - all from La Punalada (Blue Moon BMT 011)

     15)  Juan D'Arienzo
        El Internado
        Jueves
        Tucuman
        El Purrete
        - all from La Punalada (Blue Moon BMT 011)

     16)  Orquesta Juan D'Arienzo
        Derecho Viejo
        Organito de la Tarde
        Don Juan
        Pampa
        - all from La Cumparsita (Phillips)

     17)  Carlos Di Sarli
        Porteno y Bailarin
        Un Tango y Nada Mas
        Vieja Luna
        Duello Criollo
        - all from El Senor del Tango (El Bandoneon EBCD 38)

     18)  Carlos Di Sarli
        A La Gran Muneca
        El Cabure
        Verdemar
        Milonguero Viejo
        - all from Milonguero Viejo  (Music Hall 10018-2)

     19)  Carlos Di Sarli
        La Marocha
        Duello Criollo
        El Choclo
        Mi Refugio
        - all from Milonguero Viejo  (Music Hall 10018-2)

     20)  Carlos Di Sarli
        Don Juan
        Tinta Verde
        Germaine
        Comme Il Faut
        - all from Instrumental (BMG RCA)

     21)  Carlos Di Sarli
        Bahia Blanca
        - from The Tango Lesson (Movie Soundtrack)  (Sony)
        El Pollito
        - from Instrumental (BMG RCA)
        El Amanecer
        - from Instrumental (BMG RCA)
        El Once
        - from Instrumental (BMG RCA)

     22)  Carlos DiSarli
        Organito de la Tarde
        Champagne Tango
        El Pollo Ricardo
        El Inginerro
        - all from Instrumental (BMG RCA)

     23)  Anibal Troilo
        Quejas de Bandoneon
        - from Su Mejores Momentos (Music Hall)
        El Marne
        - from Su Mejores Momentos (Music Hall)
        El Pollo Ricardo
        - from Su Mejores Momentos (Music Hall)
        Malena
        - from Del Tiempo Guapo (El Bandoneon EBCD 47)

     24)  Anibal Troilo
        Milongueando en el 40
        Ojos Negros
        La Maleva
        El Enterriano
        - all from Quejas de Bandoneon (El Bandoneon EBCD 67)

     25)  Anibal Troilo
        Fuegos Artificiales
        Don Juan
        El Cantor de Buenos Aires
        Chique
        - all from Quejas de Bandoneon (Music Hall)

     26)  Anibal Troilo
        Gaupeando
        Cordon de Oro
        Toda Mi Vida
        Cachirulo
        - all from El Inmortal Pichuco (El Bandoneon EBCD 1)

     27)  Osvaldo Pugliese
        Tierra Querida
        Mala Junta
        Orgullo Criollo
        Boedo
        - all from DeCaro por Pugliese  (EMI)

     28)  Osvaldo Pugliese
        Galleguita
        Las Marionetas
        Dandy
        Tiny
        - all from La Yumba (Blue Moon BMT 010)

      29)  Osvaldo Pugliese
        La Yumba
        - from The Tango Lesson (Movie Soundtrack)  (Sony)
        Gallo Ciego
        - from The Tango Lesson (Movie Soundtrack)  (Sony)
        Corientes y Esmeralda
        - from Recuerdo  (El Bandoneon EBCD 71)
        Recuerdo
        - from Recuerdo  (El Bandoneon EBCD 71)

     30)  Osvaldo Pugliese
        Pasional
        Chique
        Cascabelito
        Rembranzas
        - all from Ausencia (EMI Odeon # 8 35886 2)

     31)  Osvaldo Pugliese
        Farol
        Fuimos
        Emancipacion
        La Mariposa
        - all from Ausencia (EMI Odeon # 8 35886 2)

     32)  Osvaldo Pugliese
        Emancipacion
        A los Amigos
        El Andariego
        Tinta Rosa
        - all from Argentina to the World (EMI)

     OTHER GREAT ORCHESTRAS OF THE GOLDEN AGE

     33)  Miguel Calo
        Sans Souci
        - from  Compilation, Pa' Que Bailen Los Muchachos  (Blue Moon)
        La Cantina
        - from Yo Soy el Tango  (El Bandoneon EBCD 34)
        Lejos de Buenos Aires
        - from Yo Soy el Tango  (El Bandoneon EBCD 34)
        Yo Soy el Tango
        - from Yo Soy el Tango  (El Bandoneon EBCD 34)

      34)  Miguel Calo
         Tedio
         - from Stock Privado (EMI)
         Tarde Gris
         - from Stock Privado (EMI)
         La Maleva
         - from Compilation, Pa' Que Bailen Los Muchachos  (Blue Moon)
         Saludos
         - from Compilation, Pa' Que Bailen Los Muchachos  (Blue Moon)

     35)  Rodolfo Biagi
        La  Maleva
        Union Civica
        A Mi No Me Interesa
        Zaraza
        - all from Campo Afuera  (El Bandoneon EBCD 40)

     36)  Pedro Laurenz
        Arrabal
        De Puro Guapo
        Amurando
        Orgullo Criollo
        -  all from Milonga de Mis Amores (El Bandoneon EBCD 82)

     37)  Ricardo Tanturi con Alberto Castillo
        Pocas Palabras
        Ese Sos Vos
        Cuatro Compases
        Asi Se Baila el Tango
        - all from Cuatro Compases (El Bandoneon EBCD 48)

     38)  Ricardo Tanturi con Enrique Campos
        Muchachos Comienza la Ronda
        Asi Se Canta
        Una Emocion
        Malvon
        - all from Una Emocion (El Bandoneon EBCD 81)

     39)  Alfredo DeAngelis
        Pura Mana
        Compradon
        El Entrerriano
        Adios Marinero
        - all from Adios Marinero (El Bandoneon EBCD )

     TRANSITION TO NEW TANGO

     40)  Mixed Tanda
        Orquesta Francini Pontier - A Media Luz
        - from Tango I (JVC)
        Orquesta Francini Pontier - Quejas de Bandoneon
        - from Tango I (JVC)
        Osvaldo Pugliese - A Orlando Goni
        - from El Gran en FM Tango
        Verano Porteno
        - from El Gran en FM Tango

     41)  Mixed Tanda
        Carlos Garcia and Tango All Stars - La Cumparsita
        - from Tango II  (JVC)
        Carlos Garcia and Tango All Stars - Adios Nonino
        - from Tango II  (JVC)
        Raul Garello - Verano Porteno
        - from Compilation, Buenos Aires by Night  (EMI)
        Los Portenos - A Media Luz
        - from Tangos de Siempre  (Seyer  SCD-1120)

     42)  Mixed Tanda
        Las Solistas - Canaro en Paris
        - from Grandes del Tango Instrumental, vol. 2  (Music Hall)
        Angel D'Agostino - El Choclo
        - from Grandes del Tango Instrumental, vol. 2  (Music Hall)
        Fulvio Salamanca - Copacabana
        - from Grandes del Tango Instrumental, vol. 1 (Music Hall)
        Juan Cambareri - Sentimiento Gaucho
        - from Grandes del Tango Instrumental, vol. 1 (Music Hall)

     NEW TANGO

     43)  New York Tango Trio
        El Enterreano
        Yuyito
        9 de Julio
        - all from Cabarute  (Lyrichord 7428)

     44)  Litto Nebia Quinteto
        Tango Canyengue
        Maladandra
        Nostalgias
        - all from Tangos Argentinos de Enrique Cadicamo  (Iris 980)

     45)  Mixed Tanda
        Trio Pantango - Silbando
        - from Tango Argentino  (ARC  EUCD 1257)
        Hugo Diaz (harmonica) - Milonga Triste
        - from The Tango Lesson (Movie Soundtrack)  (Sony)
        New York Tango Trio - Don Juan
        - from Cabarute  (Lyrichord 7428)
        Francini Pontier Orquesta - El Amanecer
        - from Tango I (JVC)

     LA CUMPARSITA

     46)  La Cumparsita - Finale
        Juan D'Arienzo - La Cumparsita
        - from Compilation, 16 Grandes Tangos (RCA)
        Tango X 2 - La Cumparsita
        - from Una Noche de Tango

     MILONGAS

     47)  Mixed Milonga
        Juan D'Arienzo - La Punalada
        - from Compilation, 16 Grandes Tangos (RCA)
        Rodolfo Biagi - Campo Afuero
        - from  Campo Afuera (El Bandoneon EBCD 40)
        Pedro Laurenz - Milonga de Mis Amores
        - from Milonga de Mis Amores (El Bandoneon EBCD)

     48)  Mixed Milonga
        Juan D'Arienzo - El Temblor
        - from El Rey del Compas  (El Bandoneon EBCD 43)
        Rodolfo Biagi - Picante
        - from  Campo Afuera (El Bandoneon EBCD 40)
        Carlos Di Sarli - Con Alma y Vida
        - from El Senor del Tango (El Bandoneon EBCD 38)

     49)  Mixed Milonga
        Francisco Canaro - Reliquias Portenas
        - from La Melodia de Nuestro Adios (El Bandoneon EBCD 30)
        Juan D'Arienzo - Milonga Que Peina Canas
        - from La Punalada (Blue Moon BMT 011)
        Juan D'Arienzo - Milonga Querida
        - from El Rey del Compas  (El Bandoneon EBCD 43)

     50)  Mixed Milonga
        Orquesta Juan D'Arienzo - El Esquinazo
        - from La Cumparsita (Phillips)
        Miguel Calo - Milonga Antigua
        - from El Compas de Corazon (EMI)
        Pedro Laurenz - Yo Soy de San Telmo
        - from Milonga de Mis Amores (El Bandoneon EBCD 82)

     51)  Mixed Milonga
        Los Portenos - Silueta Portena
        - from Tangos de Siempre  (Seyer  SCD-1120)
        Trio Pantango - La Trampera
        - from Tango Argentino Popular (ARC Music)
        Tango X 2 - Corrales Viejos
        - from Una Noche de Tango

     VALSES

     52)  Mixed Vals
        Francisco Canaro - Ronda del Querer
        - from La Melodia de Nuestro Adios (El Bandoneon EBCD 30)
        Alfredo DeAngelis - Pobre Flor
        - from Adios Marinero (El Bandoneon)
        Osvaldo Pugliese - Desde el Alma
        - from Ausencia (EMI Odeon)

     53)  Mixed Vals
        Alfredo DeAngelis - Flores de Alma
        - from Adios Marinero (El Bandoneon)
        Miguel Calo - Bajo  un Cielo de Estrellas
        - from Yo Soy el Tango (El Bandoneon EBCD 34)
        Tish Hinojosa - Farolito
        - from Frontejas (Rounder)

     54)  Mixed Vals
        Carlos Di Sarli - Acuerdate de Mi
        - from El Senor del Tango (El Bandoneon EBCD 38)
        Francisco Canaro - Yo No Se Que Me Han Hecho Tus Ojos
        - from Tiempos Viejos  (Blue Moon BMT 018)
        Miguel Calo - El Sonadar
        - from El Compas de Corazon (EMI)

     -fin-

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Date:    Sat, 26 Sep 1998 12:13:44 -0600
From:    Tom Stermitz
Subject: Re: Tandas/Music


>     On a recent trip to Denver, Susan and I learned about an interesting
>     system of setting up tandas for a milonga on cassette tapes from Tom
>     Stermitz.  A similar approach is possible with CD-Rs.
>
>     Each tanda and the cortina is recorded on a separate cassette tape.
>     The idea of using the prerecorded tandas is to allow the DJ (me) to
>     dance while permitting a fair amount of flexibility in selecting the
>     music as the evening progresses.  As a DJ, I like to select music that
>     responds to the mood of the dancers.
...
>
>     In setting up the tandas, I generally adhered to the rule of one
>     orchestra (in the same style) per tanda, but I also took a few
>     liberties here and there.  My list of tandas is below.  The list us
>     organized by style/epoch.
>
>     Comments/discussion/suggestions are most welcome.
>
>     --Steve (de Tejas)

Energy, Energy, Energy.

My friend's teenage daugter looked in at one of our dances once and said
"Those people are not having a good time."

"Well, duhhhh!" But, how do you fix it?

Scene A:
We only had 40 people that night at one of our regular First Saturday
milongas in a room that holds 200. I was in one of those moods. Depressed,
tired, listening to the same old music, watching a bunch of bored dancers
moving slowly and not particularly passionately around the dance floor.
There were 10 extra (morose-looking) women that night sitting in a row, and
only a third of the people in the room were even dancing.

Scene B:
DeAngelis bursts forth at the afternoon Pavadita milonga on Corrientes.
This salon is especially set up well for the eye-game. Ladies are popping
up like popcorn as they locked frantically on their favorite partners. I
can't get anyone to dance because they're all already up on the dance
floor. The room is electric, almost as nuclear as the Parakultural on a
Sunday evening.

A good milonga depends on the management of social energy, and the DJ is in
the drivers seat. The music you choose and the contrasting energy between
the sets is critically important in helping the dancers feel alive.

When the energy is right, hardly anyone is sitting out.


I very much prefer the system of playing tangos in sets. Each orchestra and
each era evoke such different style of dancing and different emotions. The
system of tango sets creates and highlights the distinct moods.

This is of course the Way-It-Is-Done in BsAs.

The energy is completely different without the consistancy within a set
caused by choosing one orchestra or one style and without the little breaks
to highlight the change. A good DJ who knows the music really well can feel
the energy, and adapt, and sometimes do a decent job in a more free-form
way, but that is harder, and how many of the young tango communities have
good DJs?

The other advantage is that everybody changes partners at the end of a set.
Perhaps we shouldn't need that little manipulation, but the social energy
in small, growing communities is helped by having clearly defined sets and
breaks during which you can chat and find a new partner.

But for me the primary thing, even the only thing is energy.

So many of us are learning this "second culture" and it is so difficult to
pick up the proper accent, feel and energy. By using clearly defined sets
and styles, you can pick the best and most energetic music in each
style/orchestra.

>
>     OLD GUARD
>
>     FOUR GIANTS OF THE GOLDEN AGE-D'ARIENZO, DI SARLI, PUGLIESE, TROILO
>
>     OTHER GREAT ORCHESTRAS OF THE GOLDEN AGE
>
>     TRANSITION TO NEW TANGO
>
>     OTHER GREAT ORCHESTRAS OF THE GOLDEN AGE
>
>     NEW TANGO
>
>     MILONGAS
>
>     VALSES

The classification and explanations in Daniel Trenner's catalog and website
are a good way to understand the music. I feel things differently when I am
constructing sets for dancers. What follows is the way I construct these
sets.

I agree that always playing the same order can become routine, but frankly,
I also want to dance, and this system makes it work well. Bill Petersen
from Seattle uses this system also.

CD-R's only cost a $1 or $2 so this is a better way to go, except that I
have all these old tapes and I can't afford a CD recorder...yet.

Vintage Sets

I play only a little of the older music. Perhaps just personal taste. I
don't really like the "vintage" sound of Tuba Tango, and the old guard
orchestras of Lomuto and Orquest Victor don't feel so danceable to me. I do
play Firpo, but then he feels vintage even later in his career.

Canaro isn't really in the same group for me, since he is so lyrical, and
of course he crosses styles since he played for so long. I only use early
Canaro.


Rhythmic Sets.

Instead of Old Guard (1920s?), I jump to the 1930s. I classify the feeling
of this music as more rhythmic and playful, even "rinky-tinky" (thank you
Larry from Seattle!). These orchestras call for close embrace, energetic
and rhythmic dancing.

D'Arienzo, Biagi, some Tanturi, Fresedo, Firpo.


Lyrical/Sentimental Sets

I don't mind playing singing tango, especially Calo with Podesta or some
Tanturi. Even here I mostly stay in the 1940s. By the 1950s with more and
more (concert) tango it is easy to lose the good dance energy.

Calo, Laurenz, Canaro,


Dramatic Sets

People practice so much to DiSarli that it is familiar, even boring. In the
context of a milonga it contrasts so starkly compared with the Lyrical or
Rhythmic that it is like hearing it completely fresh. Pugliese is hardest
to learn to dance, but Oh-So-Special for the better dancers. Pugliese with
open or close embrace, but usually close, especially with sad songs like
Cascabelito or torrid ones like Pasional.

DiSarli, Pugliese


Energetic Sets

Is it possible to do a milonga without playing Pavadita? Would the dancers
ever forgive you?

DeAngeles, Tanturi, Early Troilo,

Milongas

Again a sure-fire energy shot comes from the Waltzes and milongas. With
milongas you have to be careful about the later ones from the 1950s. If
they don't have the solid "swing", then people just dance on the fast beat
and never hear the Bump, B-Bump-Bump of the good 1930s milongas. Canaro
milongas from his early recordings have it, even that great Taquito Militar
by Mores has lost a little of the swing.

Does anyone know where to get good Fresedo milongas?

Waltzes.

If foreigners have a hard time hearing the swing of milonga and the energy
of tango, this never seems to be a problem for the waltz. There is
something about the 1-2-3 that sweeps everybody in the room into that
rhythm. Fast or slow, singers or no. The only waltzes that are really owful
for a milonga are the rancheras and folk waltzes. Canaro has some that
simply don't feel right.


Modern Tango.

I am mostly a purist, sticking with the 1940s or 1930s, but many people
hear the really strong melody lines and very high energy of modern music
more understandable. Aspiring stage stars without training or social graces
can be a hazard on the dance floor, but my theme throughout this discussion
is Energy and Contrasting Energies. Throw the dogs a bone and let them
fight for it. That is better than a bunch of morose-looking, slow-moving
bored-out-of-their-body dancers.

If you look through my list, I emphasize the importance of energy and
excitement. If you get stuck with slow, undanceable music, then people
start sitting down and eventually stop coming.

Tom Stermitz
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Date:    Sat, 26 Sep 1998 17:39:07 -0500
From:    "Stephen P. Brown"
Subject: Re[2]: Tandas/Music
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII

     I agree completely with Tom' assessment that the DJ is in the driver's
     seat when it comes to developing the energy, energy, energy that makes
     the milonga into something special.

     When a dancer is pressed into duty as the DJ, a compromise must be
     struck between the spontanaety permitted by playing freely from big
     collection of CDs or using the best pre-recorded music.  Pre-recorded
     tandas on cassette or CD-R are good compromise, and may actually be
     superior to a non-dancing DJ who may less able to experience directly
     the energy on the dance floor.

     And, as Tom wrote:
     >By using clearly defined sets and styles, you can pick the best and
     >most energetic music in each style/orchestra.

     Personally, I like some of the music produced, by what I call the Old
     Guard.  Much of it has great rhythmic drive that gives energy to the
     milonga.

     Any method of classifying orchestras/music is arbitrary, particularly
     when an orchestra leader changes sound over time.  But, personally I
     agree with Tom's assessment that much of the music must provide a
     rhythmic drive--and so much the better if it supports close-embrace
     dancing.

     Classifying music as rhythmic or dramatic, one could reorder my list
     of tandas to find as much rhythmic music as Tom seems to reccmend.

     Rhythmic Old Guard:
     Tandas 1-8
     DeCaro, Orquesta Tipica Victor, Carabelli, Fresedo, Canaro, Tubatango

     Rinky-Tink Rhythmic Golden Age
     Tandas 11-16, 35, 37, 38
     D'Arienzo, Biagi, Tanturi

     Mixed Old Guard and Rinky-Tink Rhythmic
     Tandas 9, 10

     Other Rhythmic Golden Age
     Tandas 26, 33, 34, 36, 39
     Troilo, Calo, Laurenz, DeAngelis

     Dramatic Golden Age
     17-25, 27-33
     DiSarli, Troilo, Pugliese

     I will maintain, however, that some Di Sarli should be regarded as
     quite rhythmic, even if it does not well support close-embrace
     dancing.  That is the reason, it often the choice of teachers.  It is
     also useful as early in the milonga to help the newerd ancers find
     the rhythm.  Of course, some of Pugliese's music is quite rhythmic.

     Transition to New Tango
     40-42

     New Tango (more broadly defined than by Daniel Trenner
     43-45

     La Cumparsita (to end the evening)
     46

     Milongas (all mixed orchestras)
     47-51

     Valses (all mixed orchestras)
     52-54

     An interesting note is that a recent issue of El Firulete contained an
     interview with a DJ who plays for milongas in BsAs.  He confirmed that
     dancers prefer that each tanda use music from a single orchestra and
     in the same style.  One could not mix early and late Pugliese for
     instance.  He said that he had been trying to develop sets that mixed
     orchestras but kept the style constant.

     Of course, the final result depends on how well the DJ selects music
     to keep the dancers moving.  Last night, I saw few dancers standing
     around, and many were surprised how late it was when the first La
     Cumparsita hit their ears.

     --Steve de Tejas

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Date:    Sat, 26 Sep 1998 19:51:42 -0400
From:    Matej Oresic
Subject: Tandas


Hello,

it's wonderful to see how much the appreciation for playing good music
has developed within the last year or so. In Ithaca, we switched to
recorded tandas on tapes few months ago, and it really does change the
pace...

However, adding some non-tango sets is also quite important (swing,
salsa/cumbia) to keep the energy up. Among not mentioned sets, I'd like
to recommend in particular early Di Sarli (early 30s) and his first
period with the great orchestra (late 30s, early 40s; instrumentals as
well as with singers Rufino and Podesta). Tanturi did also wonderful
recordings with singers Osvaldo Ribo and Roberto Videla in mid/late 40s,
... needless to say, one should not miss Enrique Rodriguez with Armando
Moreno. Regarding D'Arienzo, I'd rather put together instrumentals from
the same period, and same singer from the same period (Echague in late
30s, Maure early 40s...).

However, one shouldn't be too serious about keeping the same orchestra
in one tanda. Sometimes one can find pieces with the similar flavor
among the different orchestras. Playing De Caro and early Pugliese (De
Caro's arrangements) together can be quite nice and interesting, and so
is, for example, playing slow vals set with Pugliese's Desde el Alma and
Canaro's Corazon de Oro and Vibraciones del Alma. On the other hand,
there are also pieces that are quite untypical of a particular
orchestra, such as Pavadita by De Angelis, Cafe Dominguez by D'Agostino,
Este es el Rey by D'Arienzo, and cannot be put in the "same-orchestra"
tanda. In BsAs the above mentioned pieces are usualy put all together in
one tanda...

For the next year's Days of Tango '99 in Ithaca/NY:
http://lancelot.bio.cornell.edu/matej/tango/tangodays99.html
in addition to inviting first class staff and the Color Tango Orchestra,
we will also feature guest and local DJs, in order to emphasize the
importance of playing good music...

Ultimately, it is the general knowledge and understanding of tango
music, as well as good feeling for the atmosphere in the milonga, that
makes a good DJ.

Best,
Matej

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Date:    Sun, 27 Sep 1998 22:42:41 -0500
From:    "Stephen P. Brown"
Subject: Clarification:  Tandas/Music


     I probably should clarify my comments about the use of DiSarli for
     dancing tango in a close embrace tango--as I have probably misused
     the concept of close-embrace dancing.

     In Buenos Aires, nearly everybody dances in a close embrace no matter
     what orchestra is playing.  In the traditional dancing spots in Buenos
     Aires, those dancing in an open embrace are likely to be foreigners or
     aspiring stage stars.  With nearly everyone dancing in a close
     embrace, identifying a style as close embrace is probably
     meaningless--even if that has become a convention here in North
     America.

     By my comments, I meant that DiSarli's music does not have the beat
     that is used for the style known as *milonguero* that is danced and
     taught by people like Tete and Susana Miller.  This style has its own
     set of steps, figures, posture and techniques. It is danced to the
     beat of 2x4 resucitated and glorified mainly by D'Arienzo, Biagi and
     Tanturi from 1935 on.  Some of Canaro, contained in the Nobleza de
     Arrabal CD is also typical of the 2x4 beat used to dance *milonguero*
     style.

     Please forgive any confusion that my use of the term close embrace
     might have caused.

     --Steve (de Tejas)
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Date:    Mon, 28 Sep 1998 01:14:42 -0700
From:    TangoMan
Subject: Re. Clarification:  Tandas/Music


>From:    "Stephen P. Brown" <Stephen.P.Brown@DAL.FRB.ORG>
>     I probably should clarify my comments about the use of DiSarli for
>     dancing tango in a close embrace tango--as I have probably misused
>     the concept of close-embrace dancing.
>     In Buenos Aires, nearly everybody dances in a close embrace no matter
>     what orchestra is playing.

Thank you Steve for bringing up the subject.
Perhaps it may be useful to remember that there is no such thing as an open
embrace because by definition an embrace is the circling or enclosure of
one's body against our own.
As the walk separates the men from the boys in Argentine Tango, the embrace
brings together the men and the women. The Tango embrace is unique because
it makes the marking of steps possible and it provides a secure and intimate
space for the response.
In general, we use the embrace not only for dancing Tango but as a form of
affection when greeting our friends. That is also why *to embrace* can be
used as *to hug, to cherish, to love.*

>    In the traditional dancing spots in Buenos
>     Aires, those dancing in an open embrace are likely to be foreigners or
>     aspiring stage stars.  With nearly everyone dancing in a close
>     embrace, identifying a style as close embrace is probably
>     meaningless--even if that has become a convention here in North
>     America.

That reminds me about the time when faced with the difficulties of playing
soccer at the international level, a group of Americans behind the North
American Soccer League proposed a sweeping set of modifications to the rules.

>     By my comments, I meant that DiSarli's music does not have the beat
>     that is used for the style known as *milonguero* that is danced and
>     taught by people like Tete and Susana Miller.  This style has its own
>     set of steps, figures, posture and techniques. It is danced to the
>     beat of 2x4 resucitated and glorified mainly by D'Arienzo, Biagi and
>     Tanturi from 1935 on.  Some of Canaro, contained in the Nobleza de
>     Arrabal CD is also typical of the 2x4 beat used to dance *milonguero*
>     style.

Well said, Steve.
When Julio De Caro split from the Juan Carlos Cobian orchestra and took
Pedro Maffia, Luis Petrucelli and called in his brothers Francisco and
Emilio, the birth of the Sexteto Tipico, the typical six piece Tango
emsemble, signaled the beginning of a renovation period characterized by the
beat of 4x4 and the onset of the New Guard. De Caro was 26 when all this
happened around 1925.
One of the reasons why D'Arienzo was never given the respect that people
thought he deserved, was because he choose to revive the old 2x4 giving it a
diabolical rhythm that brought the dancers back to the dance halls.
Although many like Tanturi, Troilo, Di Sarli, Pugliese followed suit by
speeding up their flavor of 4x4 Tango to suit the dancers, nobody ever came
close to equal El Rey del Compas, the King of Rhythm, as Juan D'Arienzo was
known by the people who danced.
Tangazos,

Alberto

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Date:    Mon, 28 Sep 1998 13:04:09 -0700
From:    Bruss Bowman
Subject: Re: Tandas/Music


Tandas..........what a wonderful idea.  Thanks Stephen for starting the
thread.

To those DJs/Dancers out there that are implementing/considering these
things, I like to think of tandas as having a couple of functions, one
short term and the other long term.  The immediate goal is obvious,
create the atmosphere for a quality milonga.  What does "quality" mean
in this case?  I think Tom S. provides a great visual when he wrote,

/*
Scene B:
"DeAngelis bursts forth at the afternoon Pavadita milonga on Corrientes.
This salon is especially set up well for the eye-game. Ladies are
popping
up like popcorn as they locked frantically on their favorite partners."
*/

Great music artistically organized literally compels the dancers to the
floor.  For those of you that have been to BsAs you probably have
experienced this same dynamic.  But for this energy to occur there has
to be a high degree of musical knowledge among the dancers themselves.

Hence the longer term goal of tandas, teaching dancers about music.  If
you organize music into sets of similar quality it helps the novice
develop an 'ear' for the music.   The list members who have contributed
to this thread obviously know a great deal about the music. But for the
majority of people just starting out, hearing the difference between the
orchestras ( musical styles ) is quite difficult. Organizing music in
tandas is a valuable tool towards that education.  As you develop an ear
for the music the dances you construct to orchestra A will necessarily
be different than to orchestra B.  ( eg Biaggi v. DiSarli ). And more
than likely you will have favorites that match your 'style'.  My
personal favorite is Calo.  This idea was articulated by Stephen who
wrote;

/*
     By my comments, I meant that DiSarli's music does not have the beat
     that is used for the style known as *milonguero* that is danced and
     taught by people like Tete and Susana Miller.  This style has its
     own set of steps, figures, posture and techniques.
*/

That is not to say that Tete can't dance to DiSarli but that his "style"
is closer to the more rhythmic orchestras.  And if you watch his dancing
closely you will find that his style changes when dancing to the more
dramatic music.

For me dancing to the music and styling the dance around that music is
perhaps the single most valuable quality a dancer can have.  This is
just as important for the followers as well as the leaders.  If a leader
is absolutely matched to the music and the follower can perform steps
but doesn't feel/know the music then the dance ends up being quite
hollow ( for the leader anyway ! ).   The very best followers are those
that know the music intimately such that they know where the lulls and
accents will be in the dance even before you lead them.

It would be nice to hear from some of the other list members on this
subject.  How do the Europeans play their music?  To the non-DJ types,
how do you categorize ( if you do ) the different orchestras in your
mind and what impact does this have on your dancing?  Favorites?


Best Regards,
Bruss


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Date:    Mon, 28 Sep 1998 16:55:23 -0400
From:    Enrico Massetti
Subject: Re: Tandas/Music ... on minidisk!

>Tandas..........what a wonderful idea.  Thanks Stephen for starting the
>thread.


When few months ago I've been volunteered by our group to be the DJ
in one of our weekly milongas, I asked myself:

"And now what, do I have to give up dancing?  NO WAY".

I bought a portable minidisk recorder/player (about $300) and I prepared
several sets of tandas, with CD quality sound, random access (I can start
from any song, the same way I can do with CDs), but I can play one of
them in its completeness (I alterned sequences of different tandas to do
so) and go dancing while forgetting about my duty as DJ,

At the end of the minidisk I put a long "cartoon" (salsa, rock, Finnish
tango) to wake me up and tell me to go to change music.

I ended up doing also the following:

- Pugliese's Heaven (the best 25 Pugliese from 10 different CDs)
- Di Sarli for beginners (to start the milonga immediately after a
  beginners class)
- Hugo Diaz Heaven (the danceable ones, to play when the right partners
  are around)

- a set of 12 "mixers", with essentially the kind of tandas already
  published on this list (my personal interpretation of it).

I found that tandas on Minidisks have a huge advantage over tandas on
cassettes, as minidisks are as flexible as CDs, but you can record them
over again.

When I play a new minidisk, sometimes I realize that a song that sounded OK
at home has a different feeling in a milonga: no problem, I can delete it
immediately, or I can skip it and delete it later on.

The portable recorder/player is useful, as some of the places where we go
do not have a minidisk player, and I can connect my portable to the audio
system (very easy to do).

I do not sell minidisks, or minidisks players/recorders, and I do not
own Sony (unfortunately).

Ciao,

Enrico

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Date:    Mon, 28 Sep 1998 15:52:01 -0700
From:    TangoMan
Subject: Re: Tandas/Music ... on minidisk!


>From:         Enrico Massetti

>- Di Sarli for beginners (to start the milonga immediately after a
>beginners class)

That's why on Saturday nights at Sunderland hundreds of beginners flock to
the dance floor every time Beginner's DJ Felix Picherna plays tanda after
tanda of beginner music by Carlos Di Sarli!!!
Thank you Enrico, wait until I tell Gerardo Portalea that he's still a
beginner, dancing to that morose beginner tune called Los 33 Orientales
played by El Senior del Tango Principiante.
I'm not sure though that I can talk him into Hugo Diaz. I'm afraid what
he'll do with the harmonic, worse yet, which part of my body he'll insert it
in. Ouch!
On the other hand, I may have a Tango version of Classical Gas to add to
your minidisk.     ;-)
Turulu,

TangoMan
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Garrit Fleischmann Sep.98
Email: kontakt(at)cyber-tango.com